Guest Blog for HiringLibrarians.com

doucett_cover_final.inddThe following was written as a guest author blog for the Hiring Librarians blog written by Emily Weak and will be published on her blog Feb. 13. 

Please check out Emily’s blog at http://hiringlibrarians.com/category/authors-corner/.  I’m including the article here because it is nice to have something new in my blog!  I’m also hoping this will spur me on to more regular writing….we’ll see what happens!

When I started working after I graduated from college I had no idea of how much I didn’t know.  I happily jumped into my first job, assuming that my good education had prepared me to deal efficiently and effectively with anything.  Boy, was I wrong!

I found in that first job (I was a receptionist for six months) and the next job and the next job (and every job since then) that every workplace has all sorts of unwritten rules, expectations, and required skills that no one ever tells you about when you are interviewing.  And, even when you figure out all of that for one job, the next job generally is completely different.

I didn’t realize it at the time but this is why a mentor is such a powerful tool in helping you be successful in your job.  A mentor can tell you what those rules and expectations are so that you don’t have to make yourself crazy trying to figure them out.  A mentor is someone who becomes your “path-finder” to an organization, helping you discover the best ways to get work done, interact appropriately with your co-workers and, in general, be successful at your profession.

The only problem with mentors is that good ones can be hard to find (not everyone is willing to dedicate personal time to helping someone else be successful in their job) and when you do find them, they don’t always know how to be a good mentor.  Over time I have had several mentors who were all very successful in their own jobs but weren’t sure how to help me with mine.  Since I wasn’t sure how they could help me either, things went nowhere pretty quickly!

Learning from my own experiences with and without mentors is what led me to write What They Don’t Teach You in Library School.  I wanted to write a book that would essentially be a mentor for new librarians, sharing with them some of the “secrets” to being successful in their new profession that they might otherwise only discover through painful trial and error.

I wrote the book with three goals:  1) the advice provided had to be very practical and down-to-earth.  I wanted to identify work practices that were easy to understand and simple to try-out; 2) the book had to be supportive, just like a real mentor.  I wanted readers to walk away feeling like they had been talking to a supportive friend and now had some good ideas that they could try out; 3) the book needed to be informal because I thought that would make the information more accessible.

To support these goals I start each chapter with a statement that describes what you will find in that chapter.  This preview statement makes it easy to determine if you want to keep reading or move on to a different topic that might be more relevant to you personally.

The preview statement is followed by an articulation of why you should care about the topic.  Again, this is meant to help each individual figure out if the information will be useful.  I don’t want readers to waste their time going over information that they already know or don’t think will have value to them professionally.

The book is short on purpose.  I know librarians are generally loaded up with work the minute they walk in the door of a library and personal development time is hard to come by.  So, my goal is to share information that the reader can go through quickly and is easy to read.  There are lists and summaries and a few other resources that I’ve found helpful.  None of this is meant to be exhaustive in nature.  It is meant to be more like a conversation between two individuals in which one is sharing information with the goal of helping the other.

Several of the chapters in What They Don’t Teach You in Library School focus on very standard librarian development opportunities: how to manage problem patrons, promotional marketing strategic planning, and facilities management (written by a library director who has been a great mentor to me in this profession, Bob Dugan).  In those chapters I’m providing information that you would probably learn over time on the job.  However, I included them because sometimes as new librarians we get dumped into situations right off the bat that require more experience than we have, fresh from library school.  These are meant to prepare you in case that happens to you.

The remaining chapters present information that I garnered from my business career.  I’ve included them because they are not always thought of as skills that are necessary to be a successful librarian but I have seen first-hand how much mastering them can add to a librarian’s professional capabilities.  So, you’ll find chapters that tackle topics like networking, managing confrontation productively, public speaking and thinking like a retailer.  None of these chapters will make you an expert on the topic but they will give you some common-sense ideas about how to approach the matter at hand in a positive, constructive way.  That attitude, in turn, will help your manager to see you as a professional who is doing a great job.

My hope is that over time librarians will start to see the high value of these (and other) business skills and embrace them as being just as important as knowing how to catalog a book, or do a story-time, or conduct a reference interview.  I very strongly believe that the more skills we can provide to our communities, the more our profession will stay valuable and relevant as we move into the future.

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